#1  
Unread 06-03-2008, 01:07 AM
Rockie
 
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Default Employees Borrowing Items/Money From Each Other

I have had several instances of employees borrowing money and items from other employees and then either not paying the money back or not giving the items back.

Recently an employee "lent" someone a recorder to tape an alleged harasser (outside the workplace). The borrower evidently had her car repossessed with the recorder inside it...the recorder cannot be retrieved. The lender either wants her recorder back or the $100 that it cost. This is an ongoing bone of contention between the two employees.

I realize that this is their own business, but it is beginning to affect their work relationship.

Have any of you had similar experiences and how have you handled them.


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  #2  
Unread 06-03-2008, 02:16 AM
stilldazed
 
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Default RE: Employees Borrowing Items/Money From Each Other

We have, and as an employer, we generally tried to say out of the issues until they overflowed into the work environment. Direct discussions have been effective, reminding the parties that regardless of their personal actions, they remain employees of the same company/department and are expected to work and conduct themselves accordingly and within company policy. That has been enough so far. We have one situation of one carrying another to court--one borrowed money from the other and failed to repay, the other took the one to court, and the court took action on behalf of the plaintiff. The two continued to work together, and coworkers never knew a thing.
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  #3  
Unread 06-03-2008, 08:17 AM
DavidS
 
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Default RE: Employees Borrowing Items/Money From Each Other

These situations can be tricky; but all you can do is address any negative impact on the work environment. I would counsel the employees regarding the potential impact if the matter does spill over into the work place.

At a past employer, I dealt with a supervisor who first bought groceries for an employee who was having financial problems; and then rented a house she owned to the employee (at reduced rent, no less). Well, after a few months, the employee fell behind in rent payment. The supervisor eventually became frustrated and wanted to fire the employee. We (HR) said no. The employee's non-payment of rent was not work related. We told the supervisor that she would have to handle the situation as a tenant/landlord matter. Unfortunately, the supervisor was not able to separate the off-work relationship from the work relationship. We were on the road to disciplining the supervisor when the employee resigned.
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  #4  
Unread 06-03-2008, 01:07 PM
Paul in Cannon Beach
 
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Default RE: Employees Borrowing Items/Money From Each Other

When it came to light that one of our employees was constantly borrowing money from coworkers, I called him in and told him it needed to stop.

These are times when it helps to have a little goodwill built up with your ees. I talked with this guy and explained how his constant borrowing was making people uncomfortable. Some even were avoiding him.

Fortunately, he agreed it had become a problem and (to my knowledge) has stopped. Constant borrowing is a sign of serious financial disorganization and immaturity. Its a small step to go from a serial borrowing to stealing. I would take it seriously and let the borrower know that you frown on the behavior.

Dave Ramsey has a product called "Financial Peace University". We purchased all of his books and DVDs and make them available on loan to our employees who are interested in getting their financial house in order. Ramsey also has a workplace edition which I have not personally checked out but would expect it to be very good.
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  #5  
Unread 06-09-2008, 06:31 AM
OKBassman
 
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Default RE: Employees Borrowing Items/Money From Each Other

We've had some issues with this in the past. In one case, one of our employees was constantly borrowing money and bumming rides off co-workers without repaying the loan or paying for any gas. He eventually lost his job due to attendance because everyone in his area stopped giving him a ride to work. Moral to the story: Sometimes these people's failure to plan and failure to do right by others will result in natural consequences that diminish HR's headaches.

Second issue. Had some problems with senior employees borrowing stuff from newer employees then not replacing, repaying, etc. (Tools are required in our workplace). I started counseling new employees to NEVER loan their tools to anyone and lo and behold, I haven't had any problems since I started doing that. I also told them if any senior employee has a problem with them not loaning them a tool, tell them to come visit me in HR. I haven't had 1 single visitor since I started doing this 1 and a half years ago.

We also, like an earlier comment, have had our local credit union come in and do some financial management classes for our employees. Hopefully, by offering these types of resources, the employees who need help getting their life in order can benefit and stop these disruptive workplace behaviors (borrowing).
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  #6  
Unread 06-09-2008, 08:56 AM
Paul in Cannon Beach
 
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Default RE: Employees Borrowing Items/Money From Each Other

nice first post, OKBassman.

Now you just need to explain your name.
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  #7  
Unread 06-09-2008, 11:00 AM
ACU Frank
 
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Default RE: Employees Borrowing Items/Money From Each Other

nice first name, Paul In Cannon Beach.

Now you just need to explain your post.
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  #8  
Unread 06-11-2008, 01:19 AM
Rockie
 
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Default RE: Employees Borrowing Items/Money From Each Other

Yeah Bassman....this sounds a lot like "karma".

This story had an interesting (karmic) ending. The individual who did the borrowing and had a problem repaying did eventually pay up as I directly asked her what she intended to do to make this right for the person she borrowed from. That was taken care of.

Yesterday.....she conveniently (again) forgot to clock in....told our COO that she did clock in and the time that she clocked in. I pulled her time and she did not clock. We brought her in and advised that she (1) failed to clock in or out (not for the first time) and (2) she blatantly lied about this to the COO.

She is now history.


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